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Call to speak to your personal Travel Consultant 01483 345 701

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm; Saturday 9am-5.30pm

Call to speak to your personal Travel Consultant

01483 345 701

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm; Saturday 9am-5.30pm

BOLOGNA

Sat happily in the shadow of the more tourist driven cities in the north of Italy, lies Bologna. A terracotta fortress dating back to 1000 BC, the city known as La dotta (the learned – for its university), La grossa (the fat – for its cuisine) and La rossa (the red – for its buildings) is far from a one trick pony. Whilst the emphasis is placed on the gastronomy – and with some of the top chefs in the world basing themselves here, it’s not hard to see why – the real attraction of Bologna is its culture. One that goes beyond the depth of a bowl of ragu.

Sporting one of the oldest universities in known history which acted as the world’s pioneer of medieval medicine in its day, the Università di Bologna is still one of the most highly regarded educational establishments in Europe. Standing alongside it are the Due Torre, another architectural testament to how ahead of its time Bologna was and still is. Despite its quaint appearances, Bologna was one of the original sky scraper cities, boasting a total of 180 Torre or towers which reached heights of up to 100m. Whilst only 14 still stand, there are two in particular which have gained international acclaim: Asinelli and Gansenda, the reason being what they inspired rather than what they were themselves. It was during a trip to Bologna in 1961 that architect Minoru Yamasaki spotted the two towers and decided to take that inspiration back to New York with him.

Despite its history, Bologna has aged gracefully, moving with the zeitgeist and veiling itself with a youthful vibrancy which offers a plethora of theatre, art and Michelin star cuisine.